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The Machine

Cell phoneGREGORY BABLIS

MY POEM, The Machine, is about an old employee and reflects the changing dynamics of our developing modern economy and job market.

The notion of 'diploma disease' has brought with it an escalating level of educational qualification for many jobs.

The poem is also a metaphor for the fast-changing technological landscape and the insatiable demand for software changes that is seemingly designed to keep customers economically enslaved.

A relevant contemporary example of this in Papua New Guinea is mobile phone technology and people’s desire to spend on more expensive mobile phones in order to access more features on one handset – dual-sim, triple-sim and quadruple-sim become the goal.

Personally, I am happy with a phone that can make a call or send a text. If I need to take a photograph of someone or something, I will borrow a camera. Or if I need to access the internet or social media I use my laptop.

The Machine

They’ve turned you into
            a machine

And the machine has gone
            crazy

As they step on the throttle you
            flail about, lazy

Planned demise
            epitomised

And as pieces
            fly about

And you become broken
            and worn out

They groom the next
            candidate

To take your
            place

Then they cast you off
            what a disgrace

Without even a backward
            glance

It’s to the junkyard
            for you

There’s no return
            You’re part of the obsolete crew.

Goodbye!

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